Glasgow: Hyndland/Hughenden and Dowanhill West, Proposed Parking Controls, Exhibition, 30 October to 06 November

We have been made aware of this open consultation event.  Controlling car parking is critical, but we must ensure that it is not done at the expense of permeability for cycling, thus discouraging active travel.  Contraflow cycling lanes are becoming common throughout the city; Gordon Street, Dalnair Street and West Princes Street are just a few examples.  If streets that are currently two-way are proposed for one-way to allow the storage of motor vehicles on both sides without exempting bikes, as has happened in Dowanhill East, then please object.  The relevant part of the City Council’s design guide, Cycling by Design is clause 5.1.5

If you live in, work in, or travel through this area, do please get along to the consultation:

HYNDLAND / HUGHENDEN AND DOWANHILL WEST 

PROPOSED PARKING CONTROLS

PUBLIC CONSULTATION EXHIBITION – Venue: PARTICK LIBRARY

Exhibition Open to View from Monday 30 October to Monday 6 November 2017

On the following dates, council staff will also be present to answer queries & discuss proposals.

  • Tuesday 31 October, 10am to 4pm
  • Thursday 2 November, 10am to 6pm
  • Friday 3 November, 10am to 4pm

===========================================

Glasgow City Council are writing to inform you of the commencement of a voluntary consultation for the proposed Hyndland, Hughenden and Dowanhill West area parking controlled zone prior to the commencement of the statutory traffic regulation order (TRO) process.

Glasgow City Council is currently undertaking the development and introduction of significant parking control schemes throughout the Glasgow area.  This includes Hillhead, Garnethill and the Partick area.  Due to its scale, the Partick area has been split into separate schemes to facilitate the traffic regulation order (TRO) promotion and implementation process namely Partick, Hyndland/Hughenden, Dowanhill West areas and the Dumbarton Road/Argyle Street corridor.

The West End of Glasgow has excellent bus, train and subway transport links which unfortunately attracts commuters driving to the area and using the residential streets to park‑and‑ride resulting in the kerbside road space being sterilised by all day parking with indiscriminate and obstructive parking practices commonplace.  The introduction of parking controls is an effective way of managing the demand for the finite road space available by preventing all day parking thus reducing the traffic attracted to the area whilst increasing the turnover of parking spaces and improving the safety and traffic flow. Parking controls also maintains access for emergency service, refuse collection and delivery vehicles etc. and also assists the Council in undertaking routine road maintenance such as channel and gully cleaning work and road/ footway repairs.

Prior to the commencement of statutory traffic order process for the Hyndland, Hughenden and Dowanhill West schemes the Council is holding a public exhibition in Partick Library from Monday 30 October to Monday 6 November 2017. Council Officers will be in attendance to answer queries and discuss proposals on Tuesday 31 October, Thursday 2 November and Friday 3 November, as stated above.

A letter will be issued to all affected addresses within the proposed zone providing a brief summary of the proposals and will also inform of the public exhibition. 

Pre-meeting Info – Statutory Process for Parking Restrictions

Pre-meeting Info – Glasgow City Councils Local Transport Strategy in relation to Parking

Pre-meeting Info – Existing Parking Zones within Glasgow

 

Glasgow Councillor Tour 9, Thursday 19 October, Ward 23, Partick East / Kelvindale, Walking Tour with Green Councillor, Martin Bartos

On the evening of Thursday 19 October, GoBike Convenor, Tricia Fort, and member, Johnston Orr, met with Councillor Martin Bartos, for a short walking tour of Ward 23, Partick East/Kelvindale.  We took more or less the same route that we had covered with the other 3 councillors for the ward, from near Byres Road along Highburgh/Hyndland Road to Great Western Road and we walked because Martin is not yet back on his bike following a collision with a taxi some time ago.  This is the only ward where all 4 councillors have met with us, setting a great example to all the other wards!  Johnston and Martin are pictured below:

From east to west, our discussion covered, first of all, Byres Road, which is currently being considered for redevelopment.  Martin is concerned at the lack of ambition being shown in the current Glasgow City Council proposals.  We have thus put him in touch with the GoBike grouping that is developing alternative proposals, see: https://space4peoplebyresroad.wordpress.com/2017/10/20/our-vision/ and the photo at the top of this blog is option 2 showing local access and a bus route with cycle lanes both sides.  Remember that there’s a ride-out tomorrow along the route – details in the link.

Our next point of discussion was the lack of access into Dowanhill for bikes from Highburgh Road.  Caledon Street, Dowanhill Street, Beaumont Gate and Hyndland Street are all one-way southwards with no exception for cycles and the only legal option is to turn right into Crown Road South – which is on a bend, and it’s a busy road.  Contraflow cycling on one-way streets is the default position in Cycling by Design (clause 5.i.5), the City Council’s chosen design guide, so why doesn’t it apply here, where there is a toucan crossing to aid the passage of people with bikes up Dowanhill Street?  It should also be noted that contraflow cycling would reduce traffic speeds on these streets.

Third, we noted the good intention of providing disabled parking bays, also noted on our walking tour with Councillors Kenny McLean and Martin Rhodes, which extend right out to the cycle lane – potentially increasing the number of disabled people in the area!

Fourth, we looked at the buildout at the end of the row of shops on Hyndland Road.  The eastbound painted cycle lane, missing since the junction with Clarence Drive, reappears here, right on the bend and just at the pinch point where the road is at its narrowest.  The buildout has been put in place apparently to provide 2 loading bays, which are being misused as parking bays – just where the cycle lane could have been.

Fifth, we noted the blockage in the access provided to Prince Albert Road; why is no action taken against parking at all these cycle accesses?

Sixth, we discussed the potential of access via Hughenden Lane to the sports facilities and Gartnavel Hospital and points further west.

Seventh, we looked at the junction of Hyndland Road with Great Western Road, a scene of constant red-light jumping by cars and constant misuse of the left-turning lane to go straight on to Clevedon Road.  Why is no action taken to remedy this?

A further point of discussion was the type of cycle facility needed to encourage cycling.  While a segregated cycle lane is needed on either side of Great Western Road, which is a major route into the city, a two-way segregated cycle lane would be far better than the current position on Hyndland/Highburgh Road if the Council persists in allowing the storage of private property (colloquially known as car parking) on the road but reduces it to one side only.

Martin asked about traffic evaporation when roads are closed to motor vehicles, or when access is reduced, and Johnston has provided this information:

“The economic case for building cycle lanes – https://www.citylab.com/life/2013/12/safer-streets-pay-businesses/7880/ from 2013 and a pretty comprehensive roundup from 2015 https://www.citylab.com/solutions/2015/03/the-complete-business-case-for-converting-street-parking-into-bike-lanes/387595/

Closing roads to cars and traffic evaporation – the Wikipedia page on Induced Demand is a good place to start as it leads into a section on traffic evaporation https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Induced_demand and the academic study referencing UK cases (I was wrong, there are some!) – https://web.wpi.edu/Pubs/E-project/Available/E-project-051109-062746/unrestricted/D09_Traffic_Final_Report.pdf and the same studies referenced by the EU paper at http://ec.europa.eu/environment/pubs/pdf/streets_people.pdf

Plenty to digest there, and some of it is heavyweight stuff, so maybe try this news article on what Paris is doing right now for some real-world evidence from a European city’s current policy decisions – https://www.fastcompany.com/3064157/when-paris-closed-a-major-road-to-cars-half-its-traffic-just-disappeared

Connecting Clydebank Consultation – Tuesday 12 September, Clydebank Town Hall

We have been sent this invitation.  Please get yourself along if you live or work in Clydebank or travel along the affected route:

Hello,

You have received this email as you might be interested in the proposed changes to the A814 Glasgow Road/ Dumbarton Road in Clydebank. This area is included within the  Connecting Clydebank project. Further details on the project can be found on the Council’s website – http://www.west-dunbarton.gov.uk/business/regeneration/clydebank-town-centre-projects/connecting-clydebank/

Following a public consultation on the sketch design in December 2016 and the feedback received from the community, the Council together with Sustrans have been progressing the design. A Final Draft Design has now been produced and we want to share this with all stakeholders and get your views on the proposals.

You are therefore invited to a drop-in consultation event to be held on Tuesday, 12th September 2017 between 3pm and 8pm in Clydebank Town Hall. Just come to the venue at any time between 3.00pm and 8.00pm – officers will be on hand to discuss the project and answer any questions you may have and get your feedback on the proposals.

Details of the event are on the attached flyer. Leaflet Sept Consultation Final Please share this within your wider network of contacts.

I hope you can make it along.

Regards, Davina

Davina Lavery, Regeneration Officer

Regeneration, Environment and Growth, Council Offices, Garshake Road, Dumbarton G82 3PU,     01389 737597 or 07815 705755,  davina.lavery@west-dunbarton.gov.uk

The nights are drawing in but lots to do as September approaches

Yes, the nights are drawing in so it’s time to check out those lights for your bike, but don’t forget all the things that are on from now through into September.  We have told you about some of them and there is detail to follow on others, but here’s a summary – get them in your diary and get out to them on your bike: Continue reading “The nights are drawing in but lots to do as September approaches”

Glasgow’s South City Way – further Public Consultation, 29 August

We have been sent the following e-mail.  Please attend the event if you can and respond to the consultation to ensure that we get a good quality Queens Park to City Centre cycle route.  We understand that there is some opposition to the route continuing directly down Gorbals Street from The Citizens Theatre and the developers of the land opposite the Citz.  The Theatre seems happy to have buses and trucks rumbling past but does not want bikes gliding along in front of their building, while the developers apparently want to extend their ground and have private parking for the new housing on Gorbals Street!  The very opposite of active travel!

From: “Maclean, Allan (LES)” <Allan.Maclean@glasgow.gov.uk>
Date: 18 August 2017 at 12:05:54 BST
To: undisclosed-recipients:;
Subject: FW: SOUTH CITY WAY – PUBLIC CONSULTATION (29 August 2017)
To: Strategic Plan for Cycling transport sub-group members

SOUTH CITY WAY (Queen Park Station to Cumberland Street section)

As you may be aware, South City Way is a proposed active travel corridor between Queen’s Park and the City Centre. South City Way was the winning project in last year’s Community Links Plus funding competition organised by Sustrans and the Scottish Government. The Council attracted £3.25m of external funding towards the scheme, with the Council also contributing £3.25m. Details of the project can be found by visiting www.glasgow.gov.uk/scw.

Two public consultation events were held during the bid stages of the competition concerning concepts for the route. Since the winner’s announcement last summer, the Council has been progressing preliminary design work for the route and designs for the Queen’s Park and Queen’s Park Station section were published last May at a public event on Victoria Road. It is now intended to publish design proposals for the next section, from Queen’s Park Railway Station to the Cumberland Street junction. Once again, a public event is planned and anyone can drop-in to speak to Council Officers, design engineers and representatives from our funding partner Sustrans. The design proposals will also be available on line at the above webpage, following the event.

Details of the drop-in event are as follows:

DATE/ TIME:         Tuesday 29th August 2017 from 3pm to 7pm

 VENUE:                  Govanhill Housing Association, Samaritan House,

       79 Coplaw Street,       Glasgow       G42 7JG

 Further consultation events will be held in the future, as the plans for new sections of the route develop.

If you require any further information, or cannot make the event and wish to send us your comments, please contact us via email at sustainabletransport@glasgow.gov.uk or by phoning 0141 287 9171.

Allan Maclean, Project Officer

Technical Services, Land & Environmental Services

Glasgow City Council, 231 George Street

GLASGOW G1 1RX, Phone 0141 287 9038

allan.maclean@glasgow.gov.uk

www.glasgow.gov.uk

Partick 20mph, the discussion goes on …

You may remember that last month we posted our response to Glasgow City Council’s proposals for parking restrictions within the 20mph zone in Partick.  While we support 20mph as a default urban speed limit, we do not support Glasgow City Council’s piecemeal approach.  We are very unhappy that parking is allowed on both sides of relatively narrow one way streets, which prevents not only cycle lanes being provided but also prevents contraflow cycling.  Indeed, it seems that some streets are made one way simply to allow parking both sides.

Glasgow City Council have responded to our letter with an e-mail that:

  • implies we want every road and street in Glasgow to be 20mph.  We do not; we accept that some radial routes will operate at 30 or even 40mph.
  • maintains their piecemeal approach, albeit they are accelerating slightly, which could take years to make the city a 20mph city, save for exceptions of some main roads outwith shopping areas or high accident areas.
  • maintains their current approach to installing traffic calming.

All this is an expensive way to do what, in our view, could be done quicker by following what we understand to be the Edinburgh approach, ie a city-wide approach.

Our 2 letters and the intervening GCC e-mail text are on our Consultations page.  Please read them and do comment on further Consultations, particularly if you live or work in the areas affected.

Byres Road design events – your invitation!

One of our members has forwarded this invitation for us all:

Your invitation – please share!

Since the launch event on 23 February, we’ve been busy with technical surveys and initial design work for the redesign of Byres Road.

A series of public events will be taking place in August to share different options. Everybody is welcome – we need input from as many people as possible to guide us to the right solution.

Please come. And please share this invitation!

More information in the flyer and text below….

What’s this about? 

There’s a new Byres Road coming… funding of £9m has been allocated through the Glasgow City Region Deal to make Byres Road a great place to be. Work will start on the ground in late 2018.  We have until then to do the design work – with public input – and get the necessary consents in place.

How can I get involved?

During August 2017 there will be a series of design events where we’ll share different options to balance pedestrians, cyclists, buses and traffic — and to make Byres Road a better place for everybody.

This is everyone’s opportunity to reshape Byres Road as a world-class street for businesses, residents and visitors. Come and have your say.

Drop-in design days on 14-16 August are our big focus. Initial design options will be on display, with the design team there to hear your thoughts. This is your opportunity to shape the future of the street!

Monday 14 August 1pm-7pm Hillhead Library
Tuesday 15 August 1pm-7pm Hillhead Library
Wednesday 16 August 1pm-7pm Hillhead Library

Inclusive design workshop on Monday 7 August is specifically for disabled people, elderly people and those with long term health conditions. It will be held in an accessible West End venue on Monday 7 August.  Please book in advance via Glasgow Disability Alliance: admin@gdaonline.co.uk or  0141 556 7103.

Business breakfast on Tuesday 15 August is for anybody who runs or works in a business on or near Byres Road. Drop in between 8am and 10am for a chat with the design team – we’ll be at The Hill, 94 Byres Road. Help shape the proposals so that they are good for business!

To find out more about the project….

Check out the exhibitions in Hillhead and Partick Libraries for more information.
Facebook.com/ByresRoadCorners has lots of informative posts and debate.
Contact us direct at byresroadcorners@gmail.com or 07900 334110.

Check out the conversations on our Facebook page