Consultation Digest Issue 33. 30 April 2019, success and disappointment in Glasgow and some big issue surveys for you to complete.

In this issue we have good news on Byres Road, bad news on Elmbank Street (again) but please rush to complete North Toryglen survey TODAY, followed by a more relaxed rush for the Infrastructure Call for Evidence (Item 1.2) and then tell Glasgow City Council what should be done to combat climate change (Item 1.6).

Contents

Section 1: Current Consultations

  1. Closes TODAY! North Toryglen green space and active travel designs, open on-line until TODAY, 30 April
  2. **NEW** Infrastructure Commission for Scotland, Call for Evidence, closes 03 May
  3. Edinburgh Napier and Transform Scotland, Pedestrian Crossing Facilities User Survey, closes 10 May
  4. **NEW** Scottish Government – Consultation on Environmental Principles and Governance in Scotland, closes 10 May
  5. **NEW** Glasgow, B759, Cathkin Road, 30mph Speed Limit Traffic Regulation Order, closes 21 May
  6. Glasgow Climate Change Survey, closes 31 May
  7. **NEW** Petition for a safer crossing to Victoria Park at Westland Drive, Glasgow.

Section 2: Forthcoming Consultations

Yet again, we have no advance news.

Section 3: Consultation Feedback

  1. Govan Partick Strategic Development Framework
  2. Glasgow City Council, Byres Road Public Realm: Revised Concept Design, 23 April – SUCCESS, Segregated cycle lanes to be included
  3. Glasgow, Elmbank Street: the City Council maintain their opposition to permeability
  4. Glasgow, South City Way, Gorbals Street Traffic Regulation Order

Section 1: Current Consultations in date order for responses

1.1 Closes TODAY! North Toryglen green space and active travel designs, open on-line until TODAY, 30 April

This is a delightful community scheme, transforming wasteland and introducing active travel routes, which we featured in Digest 32. Do please have a look at the plans that are here: https://www.urbanroots.org.uk/workshops/northtoryglen/ and complete the survey. Then see if you can get something similar done where you live! Here’s the letter of support GoBike has sent in.

1.2 Infrastructure Commission for Scotland, Call for Evidence, closes 03 May

Here’s a survey that Transform Scotland told us about. It’s high level but this is where we need to get our views in if we want meaningful change for active travel. Here’s the link to the call for evidence.

Let’s see if we can get some iconic cycling infrastructure! The documents aren’t long ones but there is a form that you have to return with your submission!

1.3 Edinburgh Napier and Transform Scotland, Pedestrian Crossing Facilities User Survey, closes 10 May

We mentioned this survey last time, in Digest 32, and it’s a quick and easy one to do. It’s about road crossings and your preference for them/behaviour at them. Do please give it a go.

1.4 Scottish Government – Consultation on Environmental Principles and Governance in Scotland, closes 10 May

Here’s another one that Transform Scotland passed on to us and it’s about what happens to environmental controls when we leave the EU. It’s quite alarming how much work has been done, and there still is to do, about leaving. Ideally you need to know about environmental principles and current governance controls as they are handled in the EU, but there is information in the consultation paper. Here’s the link to the consultation, so give it a try.

1.5 **NEW** Glasgow, B759, Cathkin Road, 30mph Speed Limit Traffic Regulation Order, closes 21 May

This is one that we will support – unless you tell us you think Cathkin Road should remain at 40mph? This is the email that we received from Glasgow City Council on 24 April:

MESSAGE SENT ON BEHALF OF ANDY WADDELL, DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS NEIGHBOURHOODS AND SUSTAINABILITY

Dear Sir or Madam,

THE GLASGOW CITY COUNCIL, (B759 Cathkin Road) (30mph peed Limit) Order 20__
Further to my consultation email of 26 March 2019 regarding the above named Traffic Regulation Order, and in accordance with statutory procedures, I now enclose a copy of the press notice of the proposed Order, relevant map, statement of reasons and detailed report.

I would once again ask that you pass this information on to all bus operators likely to be affected by these proposals.

Details of the proposals will also be available on the Glasgow City Council website at
www.glasgow.gov.uk/proposedtro

As stated in the attached documentation, any person wishing to object to the proposed Order should send details of the grounds for objection in writing to Andy Waddell, Director of Operations, Neighbourhoods and Sustainability, Exchange House, 231 George Street, Glasgow, G1 1RX or by e-mail to
land@glasgow.gov.uk by 21 May 2019.

Yours faithfully”

We did not receive a “consultation email of 26 March”, but it looks as if one or more bus operators were not too happy with whatever went out that day, or perhaps didn’t go out. Hence, it seems, this full consultation now.

The documents attached to the email are: Advert Statement of Reasons, Plan and Report.

1.6 Glasgow Climate Change Survey, closes 31 May

This was Item 1.6 in Digest 32 and although there is still one month to respond, there’s no time like the present!

Here’s the link to the survey and here’s the link to response suggestions that we got from Extinction Rebellion.
But you will no doubt, be able to think of many more measures to reduce pollution and climate change – realistic implementation and enforcement of the 20mph speed limit in the city centre, sorting out road drainage, clearing vehicles off our pavements so that we can walk along them, cycle lanes, segregated of course, on all the main roads into the city ……

1.7 **NEW** Petition for a safer crossing to Victoria Park at Westland Drive.

Carol Monaghan MP, Councillor Feargal Dalton and Robert McKay, chair of Jordanhill Community Council at Scotstoun Pop Up Safe Crossing Protest

Off the back of one of last weekend’s many pop up Pedal on Parliament protests around Scotland, GoBike member Andy Watson has launched a petition asking for a safer crossing at Victoria Park. The protest was reported in Glasgow Live here. The notoriously dangerous double roundabout crossing that creates a real obstacle for families trying to reach the park has long been highlighted to the council. Sunday’s protest was attended by many local families as well as Carol Monaghan MP, Councillor Feargal Dalton and Robert McKay, chair of Jordanhill Community Council, who have all taken council reps to the roundabout to highlight the dangers. The council have so far maintained that as there have been no recorded fatalities at the crossing so far, it is “safe”. Help them reconsider by adding your name to this really quick petition.

Section 3: Consultation Feedback

3.1 Govan Partick Strategic Development Framework

Back in February, in Digest 27, Item 1.2, we published our response to this Framework Document and last month, 22 March (sorry about the delay in telling you) we got this acknowledgement:

Thank you for your response to the draft Govan-Partick Strategic Development Framework consultation. Your response is currently being considered by the Council as it prepares the final version of the Strategic Development Framework.

We received a substantial and diverse range of commentary on the Strategic Development Framework and the input from all respondents to the consultation was greatly appreciated. We are currently reviewing the ideas, suggestions and representations that were submitted and these will be invaluable in informing the Finalised Draft Strategic Development Framework.  Many of the responses related to wider issues than just spatial planning and the commentary is also informing the Council’s approach to the regeneration of the area more generally.

We will be in touch again soon to clarify the timescales for moving towards formal adoption of the SDF.
If you have any further questions at this time please feel free to contact us at this email address.

Best regards
Spatial Strategy Team
Development & Regeneration

3.2 Glasgow City Council, Byres Road Public Realm: Revised Concept Design, 23 April, SUCCESS, Segregated cycle lanes to be included

You can read the long-awaited decision on Byres Road here, from the City Council, Neighbourhoods, Housing and Public Realm City Policy Committee, Report by Executive Director of Regeneration and the Economy.

If you subscribe to our posts then you will have read this post which describes how the City Council have approved plans to incorporate segregated cycle lanes into the upgrade for Byres Road. If you haven’t read it then it’s well worth a read. Our thanks and congratulations go to everyone who was involved in the campaign. Unfortunately things haven’t gone so well right next door on University Avenue and we know we’ve still a long way to go before Glasgow City Council will accept, across the board, that safe active travel is a requirement on all redevelopment schemes.


Here’s some information from the twittersphere that explains why it has all taken to long to come to the Byres Road decision:

3.3 Glasgow, Elmbank Street: the City Council maintain their opposition to permeability

So a win above on Byres Road for active travel, but the situation on Elmbank Street appears to be a loser. If you have been following the sorry tale there with the loss of a route to Sauchiehall Street, you will be aware that GoBike received a favourable reception when we went to a meeting of Blythswood and Broomielaw Community Council. One of the local councillors, Bailie Philip Braat who was at that meeting, wrote in to Neighbourhoods and Sustainability and we reported on the reply he got in Digest 30, item 1.4
We were delighted to hear that the other councillor who attended that meeting, Bailie Christy Mearns wrote in to N&S on 24 April with this:

Please could you confirm whether it is technically possible to construct a safe contra-flow cycle lane along Elmbank Street? Whether this is by removing three parking spaces, realigning kerbs, and/ or altering pavement and signals.

Many cyclists are frustrated that conta-flow cycling has been removed from this street which has made it more difficult to move about with ease. Given that contra-flow lanes are the Council’s policy, I am trying to ascertain why this decision was made and how feasible it would be to reintroduce it. Despite the nearby improvements to Sauchiehall Street, cycling infrastructure has actually got worse here and I want to understand how this has been justified.

It is safe, joined-up cycling infrastructure which gets more people cycling; and I worry we are going in the wrong direction, at encouraging active travel, with this move. I look forward to hearing from you on this.

Almost quick as a flash, as if the answer was there on the shelf, came this reply just one day later, 25 April:

Dear Bailie Mearns

Thank you for your email in relation to the non-inclusion of a contraflow cycle lane on Elmbank Street as part of the Sauchiehall Street Avenue.

A primary objective of the project was to provide an environment which would enhance social and economic wellbeing of Sauchiehall Street and lead to economic growth in the area re-population of the area.


The basis of the design for Sauchiehall Street is the upgrading of the pedestrian and public transport infrastructure and installation of cycling infrastructure. Circa 550m of 2 way segregated cycle lane has been installed in an area where previously there were no segregated cycling facilities, all in accordance with Glasgow City Council policy. Construction of the proposed cycling infrastructure and median strip, required the carriageway width of Sauchiehall Street to be reduced which meant that vehicles turning into Elmbank Street have a tighter turn. In addition an ‘Avenue’ of trees has been installed to further enhance the local environment of the area within a median strip. The new cycling infrastructure connects to the ‘Connecting Woodside’ proposals in the west and the possibility of providing a link to cycling infrastructure on Cambridge Street from Rose Street is to be investigated as part the works proposed for Sauchiehall Street Precinct.  

Prior to the works 53 parking bays, none of which were disabled bays, were located on Sauchiehall Street. On completion of the works 3 number disabled bays will be installed on Sauchiehall Street, ie a 95% reduction in the number of parking bays implemented to enable the construction of the segregated cycle route and median strip.

The area within which the site is located is a major part of the ‘night time’ economy for Glasgow City Centre therefore consultations with local businesses were undertaken and the issue of reduced levels of parking on Sauchiehall Street was highlighted. To mitigate this reduction the Council committed to providing parking bays on the streets between Sauchiehall Street and Bath Street where possible. The number of bays that could be incorporated at these locations was limited given the need to maintain taxi ranks, bus stands for public transport and loading facilities for businesses. The final scheme constitutes a significant overall reduction in the level of car parking in the area.  

An existing loading bay for Sauchiehall St businesses was located on Sauchiehall Street to the west of the junction with Elmbank Street. This bay had to be removed to accommodate the construction of the segregated cycle lane and median strip. It was relocated to the north west corner of Elmbank Street. In addition an existing loading bay was located on the south east quarter of Elmbank Street to provide servicing facilities to the businesses in  Elmbank Street area and this bay was retained.

The possibility of installing a contraflow cycle lane on the west side of Elmbank Street was investigated and the required buffer zone and cycle lane have been highlighted on the attached extract from the general arrangement. The turning requirement of vehicles into Elmbank Street was added and there is a clash between the two. The visibility of vehicles exiting the loading bay would have been compromised increasing the risk of injury to cyclists heading north. As a consequence of these risks a contraflow cycle lane was not installed at this location on safety grounds.

The possibility of installing a contraflow cycle lane on the east side was also investigated however the existing loading bay and parking at this location would require to be removed. The removal of these facilities would have had a detrimental impact on the economy of the area.

Given the various factors to be considered in the preparation of the proposed layouts, a balance had to be struck to accommodate the requirements of the various interest groups. Overall, the existing footways were upgraded for pedestrians, the addition of a  segregated cycle lane has improved cycling facilities, public transport infrastructure
was upgraded and the number of parking bays available to private cars was substantially reduced whilst taking into account the impact on the economy of the area. It is accepted that, at this particular location, Elmbank Street, cycling facilities have not been incorporated into the works however when the full project is taken into consideration, segregated cycling facilities within the area have improved significantly and in accordance with Council policy.

I hope that this explanation of the consultation, care and attention that has gone into achieving the best overall balanced design for all users in the area clarifies the reasons why segregated cycling facilities were not included in Elmbank Street.

Andrew Harrison
Group Manager, Neighbourhoods & Sustainability”

Here’s the “extract from the general arrangement” referred to in the reply.

So there we have it folks – 550m of segregated cycle lane on Sauchiehall Street, but who cares whether we can actually reach it? A major part of our City Council just doesn’t get it that we cycle from A to B. Unless they think we are going to put our bikes on the back of a car, park in Elmbank Street, carry our bike across to Sauchiehall Street, and cycle up and down the 550m for an hour or two. Very disappointing indeed.

3.4 Glasgow, South City Way, Gorbals Street Traffic Regulation Order

In January we responded favourably to the consultation for the part of the South City Way that will be on Gorbals Street (see Digest 26, Item 1.3), and we have now, 18 April, received this acknowledgement:

MESSAGE SENT ON BEHALF OF ANDY WADDELL, DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS, NEIGHBOURHOODS AND SUSTAINABILITY

Dear Ms Fort,

THE GLASGOW CITY COUNCIL, (SOUTH CITY WAY) (GORBALS STREET), ORDER 2019
I refer to your support of the above named Traffic Regulation Order and can advise that your support was reported and considered. The Council have decided under its scheme of delegated functions to proceed with the proposal as advertised.

The Order was made on Tuesday, 9 April 2019 and an advert was placed in the Evening Times on Wednesday, 17 April 2019 stating that the Traffic Regulation Order has been made.
Should you require any further information on the above named Order please contact my assistant Suzette Aidoo on 0141 287 9024.

So no response to our comment that unidirectional cycle lanes should be the norm, but let’s hope that the project gets a move on and we can all soon cycle from the Clyde to Queen’s Park.

So, that’s it for now – a relatively quiet fortnight, but with lots of activity for the Pedal on Parliament, we hope you enjoyed getting out on the streets.