Consultation Digest Issue 53, 04 February 2020: Cars, Parking, 20mph, Avenues and Housing – it’s all here.

Glasgow City Council maintain their policy of “Streets for Cars” by installing speed cushions to deter high motor speeds rather than installing cycle lanes or doing other public realm works, and we also look at completed works in the east of Glasgow that we previously commented on.

Contents

Section 1: Current Consultations
  1. Glasgow Avenues – Your Avenues Consultation, online, closes 09 February
  2. Glasgow, Ardencraig Road Traffic Calming Scheme, closes 11 February
  3. Glasgow, Bankfoot Road and Wedderlea Drive Traffic Calming Scheme, closes 11 February
  4. Glasgow, Castlemilk Drive Traffic Calming Scheme, closes 11 February
  5. **NEW** Glasgow, Mosspark Drive Traffic Calming Scheme, closes 14 February
  6. Glasgow, Central District Regeneration Framework, closes 14 February
  7. Glasgow, South Side Car Club Traffic Regulation Order, closes 14 February
  8. Glasgow, Carmunnock Road Service Road, TRO, One-Way with no contraflow, closes 14 February
  9. Glasgow, Byres Road, Byres Road Traffic Management and Parking Controls, includes cycle lanes, closes 14 February
  10. Glasgow, Byres Road, 20mph Speed Limit Zone, closes 14 February
  11. Glasgow, Byres Road, Hillhead Traffic Management and Parking Controls, closes 14 February
  12. Scottish Government, Housing to 2040: consultation on outline policy options, closes 28 February
Section 2: Forthcoming Consultations
  1. Transforming Planning, National Planning Framework 4 – drop-in sessions and workshops February and March
  2. Glasgow, Byres Road Traffic Regulation Order: Drop-In Information Session, THURSDAY 06 February
  3. East Dunbartonshire Travel Survey Week, 10-16 February
Section 3: Consultation Feedback
  1. Glasgow, Mount Florida, Parking and One-Way, with no contraflow – Motor Traffic 1, Active Travel 0
  2. East Dunbartonshire Council: LDP Newsletter No.55 January 2020
  3. GoBike Ride 02 February, we visited Sighthill, North East Travel Routes and Robroyston in our tour of the East

Section 1: Current Consultations, in date order for response

1.1 Glasgow Avenues – Your Avenues Consultation, online, closes 09 February




Details of this on-line and street public consultation were given in Digest 52, Items 1.4 and 2.2 and here’s the critical information:

1. You are invited to view and comment on the concept designs online at: www.glasgow.gov.uk/avenues

2. Complete the Scottish Government ‘Place Standard’ tool online at:  www.placestandard.scot/start/glasgow-avenues-glassford-street-stockwell-street, helping us understand your perception of the street as it is today.

Do please complete the online consultation. Currently cycle lanes are shown for the very southern part of Stockwell Street, but not continuing up to Argyle Street and Glassford Street. Apparently discussion is ongoing, so do press them to do better!

1.2 Glasgow, Ardencraig Road Traffic Calming Scheme, closes 11 February

This was the first of 3 new traffic calming with speed cushions schemes that just made it into our last Digest, Item 1.5 and it’s now been joined by a fourth in this issue. Ardencraig Road is in a residential area and there are 6 schools in the area, so why isn’t the road being made more people-friendly? It really is depressing that we can’t have a more people-friendly approach to our streets. This really is a major concern and the City Council continues to treat speeding traffic in this piecemeal way, just as they did with 20mph zones.

1.3 Glasgow, Bankfoot Road and Wedderlea Drive Traffic Calming Scheme, closes 11 February

This was detailed as Item 1.6 in Digest 52 and here’s a view of Bankfoot Road, just off Paisley Road West, leading up to Wedderlea Drive.

As may be seen, the houses all have room for off-road parking, so plenty of room for improvement in line with Designing Streets. This document was issued in 2010 and “is the first policy statement in Scotland for street design and marks a change in the emphasis of guidance on street design towards place-making and away from a system focused upon the dominance of motor vehicles.” We don’t think it’s hit the desks of Glasgow City Council’s staff yet!

1.4 Glasgow, Castlemilk Drive Traffic Calming Scheme, closes 11 February

Castlemilk Drive is a major route down to Croftfoot and King’s Park railway stations and upwards to Carmunnock and the rural areas of South Lanarkshire, so why isn’t cycling being encouraged here? All the details of the proposed traffic calming were in Digest 52, Item 1.7
We fully understand that finances are tight, with the end of the financial year approaching so money has to be spent or lost, but the lack of forward thinking is extremely disappointing.

1.5 **NEW** Glasgow, Mosspark Drive Traffic Calming Scheme, closes 14 February

This proposal arrived just too late, on 24 January, for our last Digest; it’s for the eastern end of Mosspark Drive, from Arran Drive up to the junction with Mosspark Boulevard. A helpful member of staff at the City Council confirmed that west of Arran Drive, where cars are parked both sides it was not considered that traffic calming measures are required. Even here, though, where there are houses both sides, all with gardens, cars reign supreme, taking up the place on the roadway where people would normally cycle. Here’s the email that we received:

MESSAGE SENT ON BEHALF OF KEVIN HAMILTON, HEAD OF ROADS, NEIGHBOURHOODS AND SUSTAINABILITY

Dear Sir / Madam

The Glasgow City Council, (Mosspark Drive), Traffic Calming Scheme

The Council propose to consider the introduction of the above named Traffic Calming Scheme and I wish to establish the views of your organisation.

Please note that these proposals have also been released to the public by displaying on-street notices within the affected area.

Background to the proposed Scheme
The scheme is aimed at improving road safety by reducing vehicle speeds.


Roads affected by the proposed Scheme
The list of roads affected by these proposals are:-        
Mosspark Drive

Details of the proposed Scheme
The proposed Scheme (as depicted on the attached plan) will comprise of:-

·       5 sets of 3, 1.9m, 75mm high, speed cushions,

·       The installation of bollards beside the proposed speed cushions.

·       The installation of a pedestrian island at the junction with Mosspark Boulevard

Please provide any comments you wish to make on these proposals within 21 days (Reply by 14th February 2020).

Please reply directly to
LandServices.Mailroom@glasgow.gov.uk.

In the meantime, should you require any further information or clarification on any points arising from the proposals, do not hesitate to contact my assistant (name and phone number removed by GoBike).

Should the Council proceed with these proposals; I will write to you again and confirm this.

Yours faithfully”
etc

Here are the plans associated with the proposal: Full view, Island, Section 1 and 2, Section 3 and 4 and Section 5.

It’s very upsetting that so many motor drivers, in so many places, drive at speeds that endanger lives and all we do is install a few speed cushions to try to slow them down.

1.6 Glasgow, Central District Regeneration Framework, closes 14 February

This featured last in Digest 52, Item 1.8 and it’s a high-level document that will be used as a basis, or an excuse, for years to come. Our response is still being prepared as this Digest goes out but it will be sent in before the closing date.

1.7 Glasgow, South Side Car Club Traffic Regulation Order, closes 14 February

Digest 52, Item 1.9 gave all the details for this consultation and here’s the reply we sent in for the Stage One consultation. We don’t object to car clubs as such but they do take up cycling room on our roads and add to the clutter on our footways. Our reply will be similar to that at Stage One but do get your own views in, particularly if you live in the area affected by this or any other car club, or if you are a car club member yourself.

1.8 Glasgow, Carmunnock Road Service Road, TRO, One-Way with no contraflow, closes 14 February

Digest 52, Item 10 explained this proposal and it really highlights the City Council’s refusal to implement the default position of contraflow cycling in their selected design guide, Cycling by Design, Section 5.1.5. Our comments when we replied to the Stage One consultation are in this letter and will be repeated; side roads should be available and welcoming to people who choose to respect well-publicised concerns for our health and the environment by cycling. We should not be pushed onto busy main roads when alternatives are available.

1.9 Glasgow, Byres Road, Byres Road Traffic Management and Parking Controls, includes cycle lanes, closes 14 February

The details we were sent of this Order were in Digest 52, Item 1.11 and, as we informed you, we sent in detailed concerns for the Stage One consultation. We received this reply on 23 January, after querying whether our views had been received:

MESSAGE SENT ON BEHALF OF CHRISTINE FRANCIS, HEAD OF TECHNICAL SERVICES, NEIGHBOURHOODS AND SUSTAINABILITY

Dear Ms Fort,

I refer to your email of 9
th January and can confirm that we did receive the stage 1 response. Your previous objections will be carried forward into this stage of the consultation process, however, a large portion of your letter does not specifically relate to the TRO process (mostly design choices) and will not be considered as part of the objection to the TRO.

In terms of the design of the cycle lanes, these are for the most part are finalised in terms of specification (i.e. at footway level with an asphalt surface). Future design changes would be limited to localised alignment changes along Byres Road in relation to potential layout tweaks and potentially colour in addition to street furniture placement etc. Any other significant changes would be restricted to the outcome of the TRO consultations.

I can also advise that our records have been updated to reflect the change of contact information for our consultation stage emails to
consultations@gobike.org – any future TRO updates will now be directed to that email address.

If you require any further information regarding the Byres Road TRO please contact
ByresRoadTRO@glasgow.gov.uk

Yours sincerely,
” etc

While we support the limited range of the TRO, as per our post of 27 January, we remain extremely concerned that the clear and basic guidance given in Cycling by Design and good practice elsewhere is apparently not being followed for the detailed cycle lane design. See this extract from page 86 of Cycling by Design:

Our response will go in next week, but if you haven’t sent in your views yet, do please get them in by the 14th.

1.10 Glasgow, Byres Road, 20mph Speed Limit Zone, closes 14 February

Digest 52, Item 1.12 gave the details for this proposal, which we support. Suggested wording for you to add your voice was given in our post of 27 January, so do write in. Our letter will be going in soon.

1.11 Glasgow, Byres Road, Hillhead Traffic Management and Parking Controls, closes 14 February

No, the picture’s not Hillhead but there is parking nose to tail there that severely limits walking and cycling. Details of this order were given in Digest 52, Item 1.13 and our suggested wording for your response was in our post of 27 January. GoBike generally supports parking restrictions but we have become aware of one general concern and a specific one for this Order. The general concern is that parking charges in Glasgow are so low, only 80p for an hour – compare this with the cost of a return bus or subway journey and you can easily see that it is the car driver, and not the bus or subway passenger, who is being encouraged to visit Hillhead and Byres Road, and other parts of the city. The specific concern in Hillhead, one of the more affluent areas of Glasgow, is the proposal that residents be offered a second parking permit – in a city that’s hosting COP26 this year! Where’s the City Convener for Sustainability and Carbon Reduction when you need her? Let’s support her with opposing these 2 aspects of the parking Order.

1.12 Scottish Government, Housing to 2040: consultation on outline policy options, closes 28 February

Just about all new housing in Scotland is built as per this example, ie with car parking space and/or a garage, so it’s no wonder so few people cycle. Do please respond to this national consultation, which was detailed in Digest 52, Item 1.14.

Here’s the link: https://www.gov.scot/publications/housing-2040-consultation-outline-policy-options/pages/3/

Do have a look and let’s get lots of responses in that mention cycling and active travel. We know it’s the way to go.

Section 2: Forthcoming Consultations

2.1 Transforming Planning, National Planning Framework 4 – drop-in sessions and workshops February and March

The Scottish Government says: “We are committed to encouraging interest and wide public involvement in the preparation of NPF4 and want to engage with the public, community, voluntary and private sectors, as well as academics, experts and professional bodies.
We will make a particular effort to reach beyond the people and organisations normally involved in planning consultations.

Locally drop-in sessions followed by workshops are being held in Foxbar (Paisley) on 18 February, Glasgow on 17 March and Kilmarnock on 27 March. See this link for further information.

Jim, from Cycling UK in Scotland told us about this, with this email:

Hi

This is a quick note to highlight that the Scottish Government is seeking early views on the National Planning Framework 4 and is holding a series of workshops and drop in sessions throughout Scotland. See the full list here
https://www.transformingplanning.scot/national-planning-framework/get-involved/  I’m planning to be at the Glasgow event.

They also are looking for written comments – so check the same page. Its always to get ideas in early!

The NPF4 will be a hugely important Government plan for Scotland up to 2050 – it decides national investment, development and infrastructure plans for the future. They have said they will use is to take forward the transport projects needed for the future (from STPR2) – so
a big opportunity to re-state what infrastructure we think is needed for cycling and active travel. NPF3 in 2014 included the National Cycling and Walking Network so NPF4 must do much more.

Please pass this on through your networks to anyone you think might be interested.

I will be providing more information on NPF4 opportunities in the future but I’m happy to discuss with anyone.

Regards
Jim
Jim Densham
Campaigns and Policy Manager – Scotland
Cycling UK in Scotland

GoBike needs members to go to these events and feed back – please get in touch at consultations@gobike.org

2.2 Glasgow, Byres Road Traffic Regulation Order: Drop-In Information Session, THURSDAY 06 February

An event at Hillhead Library, hosted by Byres Road Corners and Hillhead Library from 2-6pm. Here’s the link: https://www.facebook.com/events/s/traffic-regulation-order-drop-/622550555222298/

Do go along if you wish to know more!

2.3 East Dunbartonshire Travel Survey Week, 10-16 February

Here’s the info from the East Dunbartonshire Local Development Plan
Newsletter, Issue 55 – January 2020

The Draft Local Transport Strategy contained an action for the Council to establish an East Dunbartonshire Travel Survey. Planning has been underway for this project and the inaugural East Dunbartonshire Travel Survey Week will take place from Monday 10 February to Sunday 16 February 2020.
Market researchers, Research Resource – on behalf of the Council – will be carrying out on-street surveys during the week beginning Monday 10 February in Kirkintilloch, Milngavie, Bearsden, Bishopbriggs, Lennoxtown, Auchinairn, Hillhead, Harestanes and Twechar.
In addition to the on-street survey, an online version is also available which can be completed between now and Sunday 16 February. Follow the link to get involved: www.researchresource.co.uk/eastduntravel.html
The survey aims to compile a picture of local travel behaviours which will provide the basis for long-term regular data collection – helping the Council to understand evolving travel behaviours and shape plans for the future.
Funding has been provided through the Smarter Choices, Smarter Places programme, administered by Paths for All.”

See Section 3.2 for a link to the whole newsletter.

Section 3: Consultation Feedback

3.1 Glasgow, Mount Florida, Parking and One-Way, with no contraflow – Motor Traffic 1, Active Travel 0
Echelon, or angled, parking into the kerb

Back in July 2019 GoBike objected, with this letter, to proposals to change the parking regime in Mount Florida. These proposals included making some streets one way and refusing to countenance contraflow cycling. There was some further correspondence with this second letter from GoBike in September and an email exchange in November. This latter exchange was published in Digest 47, Item 3.1. We did meet with Michael Brady on 12 December at Glasgow City Council offices, and contraflow cycling was discussed, but we have had no further update until this final message confirming adoption of the TRO came in on 27 January:

MESSAGE SENT ON BEHALF OF KEVIN HAMILTON, HEAD OF ROADS, NEIGHBOURHOODS AND SUSTAINABILITY

Dear Sir / Madam

THE GLASGOW CITY COUNCIL, (MOUNT FLORIDA), (TRAFFIC REGULATION) ORDER 2020

I refer to your objection to the above named Traffic Regulation Order and can advise that your objection was reported and considered. However, the Council have decided under its scheme of delegated functions to proceed with the proposal with changes as specified below:-

  • Removal of a small section of proposed no waiting at any time restrictions at the western extremity of McLennan Street at the request of a local resident in order to provide additional parking space.
  • The existing waiting/loading restrictions will remain in place on Cathcart Road between Prospecthill Road and McLennan Street following a request from a bus operator.

The Order was made on 22 January 2020 and an advert was placed in the Evening Times on 24 January 2020 stating that the Traffic Regulation Order has been made.

I realise that this may not be the outcome you wished for, however this Order will introduce improvements to the existing parking restrictions in the area.  The specific objective was to assist the local community by reducing the parking restrictions on Cathcart Road and to facilitate business activities allowing all vehicle types to utilise the designated loading areas.

In addition to the above, the Council are taking the opportunity to improve parking practices and road safety within the adjoining residential areas.  This includes ensuring crossing points are accessible, sightlines at junctions are sufficient and generally parking practices are safe and not obstructive.

Should you require any further information on the above named Order please contact my assistant (name and phone number removed by GoBike).

Yours sincerely,” etc

So there we have it: a resident gets extra parking space, a bus company gets space for its buses (and quite right too) and we get restrictions for cycling. Just what vehicle/transport/active travel hierarchy does Glasgow City Council work to?

3.2 East Dunbartonshire Council: LDP Newsletter No.55 January 2020

This newsletter contains information on:

  • The Local Transport Strategy 2020-25
  • East Dunbartonshire Travel Survey Week (See Item 2.3 above)
  • The Proposed Local Development Plan 2 – Update
  • The Scottish Government’s Consultation on a Replacement National Planning Framework (NPF4) (See also Item 2.1 above)
3.3 GoBike Ride 02 February, we visited Sighthill, North East Travel Routes and Robroyston in our tour of the East

Eight intrepid souls rode out east on Sunday morning and arrived back, still in the rain, just in time for a sunny afternoon!

Here’s the cycle lane alongside Fountainwell Road on the northern edge of Sighthill. It’s separated from the road and nice and smooth, but stops before that nasty Springburn Road.

This second view is Wallacewell Road, part of the North East Active Travel Routes, mentioned in Digest 19, Item 3.10 and the only vehicles we saw parked up in this significant length of cycle lane were 2 road-surface-laying vehicles, most probably contracted in by Glasgow City Council, tut tut. A good smooth ride again.

On our approach to Robroyston Railway Station, just opened in December. There are no cycle markings on the new access road or footway (See Digest 48 Item 1.6 for consultation for the accesses to this station) but the crossing was a toucan one and there are NO cycle lanes on the road. Of course GoBike requested cycle lanes when we responded to the TRO, but that was only for the double yellow lines. There was NO consultation on cycle access.

This is the station access on the Robroyston, northern side.

And the station parking. There is talk of cycle lanes on the south side, the Millerston side, along Station Road, although the boundary between North Lanarkshire and Glasgow runs down the centre of the road …..

Our ride finished in Govanhill and home via the still unfinished South City Way.

So that’s it, another mixed bag of delights, for another two weeks. Thanks for reading.