Consultation Digest Issue 52, 21 January 2020: Byres Road back in the news plus Glasgow takes an alphabetical approach to traffic calming!

Quite a bumper bundle for you today, but 2 of our significant concerns have raised their heads again. Firstly, side roads on cycle lanes – we need cycle lanes to continue across side roads, just as in the feature photo with this Digest. If a child in the Netherlands is able to cycle safely across a side road, a child in Glasgow should be able to too. Secondly, contraflow cycling – when cars are going too fast or more on-road parking is needed the first line of response is to make a street one-way, even for bikes. What have we done wrong? Why should we have to make big detours? Do read on for the details of all the current issues.

Contents

Section 1: Current Consultations
  1. **NEW** Scottish Government propose to build “spaghetti junction” at Sheriffhall Roundabout on the A720, Edinburgh Bypass, closes 31 January
  2. Glasgow, South West City Way, St Andrews Drive extension on-line consultation, closes 03 February
  3. Law Commission, Highly Automated Road Passenger Services, HARPS, public consultation period now extended to 03 February
  4. **NEW** Glasgow Avenues – Your Avenues Consultation, on-line, closes 09 February
  5. **NEW** Glasgow, Ardencraig Road Traffic Calming Scheme, closes 11 February
  6. **NEW** Glasgow, Bankfoot Road and Wedderlea Drive Traffic Calming Scheme, closes 11 February
  7. **NEW** Glasgow, Castlemilk Drive Traffic Calming Scheme, closes 11 February
  8. Glasgow, Central District Regeneration Framework, closes 14 February
  9. **NEW** Glasgow, South Side Car Club Traffic Regulation Order, closes 14 February
  10. **NEW** Glasgow, Carmunnock Road Service Road, TRO, One-Way with no contraflow, closes 14 February
  11. Glasgow, Byres Road, Byres Road Traffic Management and Parking Controls, includes cycle lanes, closes 14 February
  12. Glasgow, Byres Road, 20mph Speed Limit Zone, closes 14 February
  13. Glasgow, Byres Road, Hillhead Traffic Management and Parking Controls, closes 14 February
  14. **NEW** Scottish Government, Housing to 2040: consultation on outline policy options, closes 28 February
Section 2: Forthcoming Consultations
  1. Glasgow, South West City Way, St Andrews Drive extension, consultation event TOMORROW, 22 January
  2. Glasgow Avenues, Stockwell Street and Glassford Street Avenue, 25 February
  3. Glasgow, Transforming Pollok Country Park – Public Meeting, 04 February
Section 3: Consultation Feedback
  1. Glasgow, Fastlink Route, (Finnieston Bridge to Whitefield Road) Order 2015, Amendment No.1 20__, acknowledgement of GoBike objection
  2. Glasgow, Ashgill Road Traffic Calming, GCC response to our concerns.
  3. Glasgow, Duror Street, Traffic Calming, GCC response to our concerns
  4. Glasgow, construction of Sighthill pedestrian/cycle bridge to start next month
  5. Glasgow, Connecting Woodside Update, with news of new Facebook page
  6. Glasgow Avenues project, George Square and Blythswood Square.
  7. East Dunbartonshire, Proposed Traffic Regulation Order – Killermont Avenue, Rannoch Drive and Woodvale Avenue, Bearsden – Waiting & Loading Restrictions, approved

Section 1: Current Consultations

1.1 **NEW** Scottish Government propose to build “spaghetti junction” at Sheriffhall Roundabout on the A720, Edinburgh Bypass, closes 31 January

Here’s a message that has been put out by Alison Johnstone, MSP (Green Party), which is pretty clear and self-explanatory. New road construction means less money to build cycle lanes. Please respond.

“The Government look set to spend £120 million on a new spaghetti junction on Edinburgh’s bypass. We can stop them though. Government are consulting on the new junction now. Please take a second to object and ask them to invest these funds into public transport and bike lanes instead. We can’t just keep on pouring public money into building new roads like there is no climate emergency.

Take action now
 
By their own admission, the Government expects this scheme to increase traffic by 5%. Across the world we’ve learnt that if you build more road capacity it just fills with more cars and causes more pollution.


But the same is true with the alternatives. Invest in public transport, and the buses, trains and trams fill up. Build cycle lanes, and people get on their bikes.

Business as usual is killing the planet, and it’s time for change. The Government declared a climate emergency. Sheriffhall spagetthi junction is the first test of whether they mean it.

Lets make this clear and flood them with objections. Please take action and share the campaign now.

Yours
 
Alison Johnstone, Scottish Green MSP for Lothian


Take Action Now 

1.2 Glasgow, South West City Way, St Andrews Drive extension on-line consultation, closes 03 February

This has been mentioned once or twice already, Item 1.13 in Digest 49 gave the details for this on-line consultation, do please respond before it closes. Here’s the link to the City Council’s consultation page where you have to scroll down to find this one.

The survey is quite short, so won’t take you long to do – and do try to ignore all the “typos” in the information in the Council’s consultation information!

While this isn’t one of the city’s radial routes, which are so important, a good cycle route out to Pollok Park from the city centre should get people to take to their bikes. You might wish to question why the route is two-way on one side of the road rather than 2 lanes, one each side? Another concern is cycle priority at side roads – including all the driveways!

1.3 Law Commission, Highly Automated Road Passenger Services, HARPS, public consultation period now extended to 03 February

There’s no reason given as to why this consultation is being extended but here’s the email that we got on 07 January:

Dear All,

Firstly, we would like to thank all of you who have already provided responses to the consultation.

Many of you have also been in contact to request more time to complete your responses. We are happy to announce an extension to the consultation period.  

We now invite you to respond to the paper by 3 February 2020.

Our online portal for submitting responses will remain open until midnight on this date but we also welcome input in any format. Attached is a word version of the online portal – please feel free to use this form if you prefer.  

The consultation paper, summary and more details on how to respond are available on our project page at
https://www.lawcom.gov.uk/project/automated-vehicles/ 

Yours sincerely,

Automated Vehicles Team – Law Commissions

Note that the word version of the online portal is not given here. GoBike uses WordPress for its website and this does not permit the uploading of word documents. If you wish to have the word version please request one direct or email consultations@gobike.org

Here’s the letter of response that GoBike sent in on 06 January. Be afraid, very afraid!

1.4 **NEW** Glasgow Avenues – Your Avenues Consultation, on-line, closes 09 February
Glassford Street

The Avenues programme has been quiet for a while but here’s a recent email that we received last week, headed “Glasgow Avenues: Glassford Street and Stockwell Street Online and On Street Consultations”:

On 16 Jan 2020, at 19:56, Avenues <avenues@ironsidefarrar.com> wrote:

Glasgow Avenues – Your Avenues Consultation

A multi-disciplinary design team led by Ironside Farrar Ltd has been appointed to deliver the second phase (“Block B”) of the Glasgow Avenues programme which will invest £115m in the public realm of the City Centre in the next few years, introducing a network of connected ‘green’ routes across Glasgow’s city centre. 

Block B includes
Stockwell Street and Glassford Street Avenues.

The Design Team are seeking to consult with you – local residents, businesses and stakeholders –  on the draft proposals for these two streets in the following 3 ways:

1. You are invited to view and comment on the concept designs online at:
www.glasgow.gov.uk/avenues

2. Complete the Scottish Government ‘Place Standard’ tool online at:  www.placestandard.scot/start/glasgow-avenues-glassford-street-stockwell-street, helping us understand your perception of the street as it is today.

3. Drop-in to our on-street consultation: look out for out friendly
rickshaw displays on Saturday 25th January, where staff will be on hand to discuss the emerging design thinking and to record your opinion on the concept designs.

Please feel free to forward this email to other parties who may be interested in getting involved.  The online consultation is open until 9
th February 2020.

Thanks in advance for your assistance.

Kind Regards,

Charlie Griffiths

Stockwell Street

From point 1, clicking on the link will get you to the City Council’s Avenues page. Click on the down arrow at Consultations and then on “here” under “Current Consultation”.

Or you can try this quick link: https://glasgowgis.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapJournal/index.html?appid=94c1feae990244afb5650b928f14c959

The questionnaire for point 2 is quite curious – very generic, but you will be able to comment on the dominance of the motor vehicle, particularly with respect to the large areas on Stockwell Street given over to car parking. Why aren’t they proper parks, with trees and grass and somewhere to sit?

We’ve been told that the consultants have 2 rickshaws that will be moving about but do look for them at the Argyle Street precinct or further south at the car park area. If you go, do please have your bike with you, or your children, or ageing aunt in a wheelchair – anything to demonstrate that we should have priority over all the cars in the area.

1.5 **NEW** Glasgow, Ardencraig Road Traffic Calming Scheme, closes 11 February
The northern part of Ardencraig Road , near Miller Primary School, is proposed for traffic calming

Glasgow City Council now seem to have an alphabetical approach to traffic calming with this and the next 2 schemes that have arrived in the Consultations mailbox this very morning, 21 January. Here is the email and attachments for the first, Ardencraig Road in Castlemilk:

MESSAGE SENT ON BEHALF OF KEVIN HAMILTON, HEAD OF ROADS, NEIGHBOURHOODS AND SUSTAINABILITY

Dear Sir / Madam

The Glasgow City Council, (Ardencraig Road), Traffic Calming Scheme

The Council propose to consider the introduction of the above named Traffic Calming Scheme and I wish to establish the views of your organisation.

Please note that these proposals have also been released to the public by displaying on-street notices within the affected area.

Background to the proposed Scheme
The scheme is aimed at improving road safety by reducing vehicle speeds.

Roads affected by the proposed Scheme
The list of roads affected by these proposals are:-

Ardencraig Road

Details of the proposed Scheme
The proposed Scheme (as depicted on the attached plan) will comprise of:-

  • 3 sets of 3, 1.9m, 75mm high, speed cushions,
  • 3 sets of 2, 1.9m, 75mm high, speed cushions.
  • The installation of bollards beside the proposed speed cushions.

Please provide any comments you wish to make on these proposals within 21 days (Reply by 11 February 2020).

Please reply directly to
LandServices.Mailroom@glasgow.gov.uk.

In the meantime, should you require any further information or clarification on any points arising from the proposals, do not hesitate to contact my assistant (name and phone number removed by GoBike).

Should the Council proceed with these proposals; I will write to you again and confirm this.

Yours faithfully
” etc

Here are the attached documents: Proposals, Proposals Section 1 and Proposals Section 2

It’s the standard approach to high traffic speeds, yet again, by the City Council, which is now proclaiming itself as “Glasgow – proud host of the 26th UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) – UK2020” but where are the cycle lanes to the school?

1.6 **NEW** Glasgow, Bankfoot Road and Wedderlea Drive Traffic Calming Scheme, closes 11 February

Moving on to “B” and north-west to Cardonald, here’s the email from earlier today, 21 January, for these 2 residential roads:

MESSAGE SENT ON BEHALF OF KEVIN HAMILTON, HEAD OF ROADS, NEIGHBOURHOODS AND SUSTAINABILITY

Dear Sir / Madam

The Glasgow City Council, (Bankfoot Road and Wedderlea Drive), Traffic Calming Scheme

The Council propose to consider the introduction of the above named Traffic Calming Scheme and I wish to establish the views of your organisation.

Please note that these proposals have also been released to the public by displaying on-street notices within the affected area.

Background to the proposed Scheme
The scheme is aimed at improving road safety by reducing vehicle speeds.

Roads affected by the proposed Scheme
The list of roads affected by these proposals are:-

  • Bankfoot Road
  • Wedderlea Drive

Details of the proposed Scheme
The proposed Scheme (as depicted on the attached plan) will comprise of:-

  • 6 sets of 3, 1.8m, 75mm high, speed cushions,
  • The installation of bollards beside the proposed speed cushions.

Please provide any comments you wish to make on these proposals within 21 days (Reply by 11 February 2020).

Please reply directly to LandServices.Mailroom@glasgow.gov.uk.

In the meantime, should you require any further information or clarification on any points arising from the proposals, do not hesitate to contact my assistant Jordan Tracey on 0141 287 9173.

Should the Council proceed with these proposals; I will write to you again and confirm this.

Yours faithfully
” etc

Bankfoot Road, looking north from Paisley Road West

Here’s one of the feeder roads on to the cycle lanes we so desperately need on Paisley Road West if we are to achieve the modal split required to save the world. Not many, sorry, not any, apologies for not reaching the target, the aim, no sorry, just an aspiration of 10% of journeys by bike this year, were there? Let’s look to doing better this decade.

1.7 **NEW** Glasgow, Castlemilk Drive Traffic Calming Scheme, closes 11 February

On that long Castlemilk Drive (singing along to Devil Gate Drive, a classic from Suzy Q!), struggling up to, or coasting down from, the top of the hill and the countryside of South Lanarkshire, motorists are going too fast and so we must suffer yet more speed cushions. Why can’t such concerns be declared as public realm schemes and then we might get cycle lanes, giving us enough room to wobble up the hill without danger of being clipped by a close-passing motor vehicle? However, money is tight and the COP26 delegates won’t be encouraged to visit Castlemilk, so we will be stuck with another rash of speed cushions. Here’s the email received from the City Council today, 21 January:

MESSAGE SENT ON BEHALF OF KEVIN HAMILTON, HEAD OF ROADS, NEIGHBOURHOODS AND SUSTAINABILITY

Dear Sir / Madam

The Glasgow City Council, (Castlemilk Drive) Traffic Calming Scheme

The Council propose to consider the introduction of the above named Traffic Calming Scheme and I wish to establish the views of your organisation.

Please note that these proposals have also been released to the public by displaying on-street notices within the affected area.

Background to the proposed Scheme

The scheme is aimed at improving road safety by reducing vehicle speeds.

Roads affected by the proposed Scheme
The list of roads affected by these proposals are:-

  • Castlemilk Drive

Details of the proposed Scheme
The proposed Scheme (as depicted on the attached plan) will comprise of:-

  • 4 sets of 3, 1.9m, 75mm high speed cushions.
  • The installation of bollards beside the proposed speed cushions

Please provide any comments you wish to make on these proposals within 21 days (Reply by 11 February 2020).

Please reply directly to LandServices.Mailroom@glasgow.gov.uk.
In the meantime, should you require any further information or clarification on any points arising from the proposals, do not hesitate to contact my assistant (name and phone number removed by GoBike).

Should the Council proceed with these proposals; I will write to you again and confirm this.

Yours faithfully”,
etc

Here’s the plan showing the proposed speed cushions: Castlemilk Drive plan

Note the active-travel friendly parking! GoBike will applaud the aim, but not the method, of reducing traffic speeds here.

1.8 Glasgow, Central District Regeneration Framework, closes 14 February

This consultation featured in Digest 50, Item 1.7 and here is the link, again, to the City Council’s consultation page. This consultation is the second item on page 1. We hope to have the GoBike response in our next Digest.

Note that the area it covers is bounded on the south-east by Glassford Street and Stockwell Street.

1.9 **NEW** Glasgow, South Side Car Club Traffic Regulation Order, closes 14 February



Here’s a consultation that GoBike responded to at Stage One – details further on – but this is the email for the public consultation that we received on 16 January:


MESSAGE SENT ON BEHALF OF CHRISTINE FRANCIS, HEAD OF SUSTAINABILITY AND TECHNICAL SERVICES, NEIGHBOURHOODS AND SUSTAINABILITY

Dear Sir / Madam

THE GLASGOW CITY COUNCIL, (SOUTH SIDE CAR CLUB) ORDER 202_

Further to my consultation email of 3
rd December 2019 regarding the above named Traffic Regulation Order, and in accordance with statutory procedures, I now enclose a copy of the press notice of the proposed Order, relevant drawings, statement of reasons and detailed report.

The location proposed for Queen Elizabeth Gardens has been removed from this order and will be included in a future parking control order for the area.


Details of the proposals will also be available on the Glasgow City Council website at www.glasgow.gov.uk/proposedtro

As stated in the attached documentation, any person wishing to object to the proposed Order should send details of the grounds for objection in writing to Group Manager, Sustainable Transport, Neighbourhoods and Sustainability, Exchange House, 231 George Street, Glasgow, G! 1RX or by e-mail to
SustainableTransport@glasgow.gov.uk by Friday 14th February 2020.

Yours faithfully,
” etc

Here are the documents referred to in the email above: Advert, Report, Statement of Reasons, Allison Street plan, Paisley Road West plan, Torrisdale Street plan, Kenmure Street plan and Albert Drive plan.

At Stage One we were given this information by email:

Background to the proposed Order
This order is proposed to provide car club and electric parking on the south side at the locations below in line with the Council’s policy for sustainable transport and emission reductions.

Area affected by the proposed Order
The area is the south side of the city.

Details of the proposed Order
The order proposes the following restrictions as shown on the attached drawings:

  • Electric charging and car club bays on Alison Street east of Langside Road.
  • Electric charging and car club bays on Queen Elizabeth Gardens north of Old Rutherglen Road.
  • Electric charging and car club bays on Paisley Road West at Cessnock Street.
  • Electric charging and car club bays on Torrisdale Street west of Victoria Road.
  • Electric charging and car club bays on Kenmuir Street north of Albert Drive.
  • Electric charging and car club bays on Albert Avenue north of Queens Drive.

You will see that Queen Elizabeth Gardens in the Gorbals has been removed at the Public Consultation stage, presumably because of local lobbying but GoBike objected, see this letter, to the inclusion of Paisley Road West. Paisley Road West is a major arterial road connecting the city centre to the outskirts and one of the most heavily cycled roads into the city; kerbside parking obstructs the construction of the cycle lanes we desperately need on this route if we are to meet climate change targets. We have had no response from the City Council to this well-argued letter written by one of our members.

GoBike will be responding to this public consultation but if you support our views do please write in to comment or object to the proposals.

1.10 **NEW** Glasgow, Carmunnock Road Service Road, TRO, One-Way with no, or perhaps with, contraflow, closes 14 February

The service road is a residential and shopping side road to the busy Carmunnock Road and at the Stage One consultation GoBike was told that “The Council have been made aware of road safety issues with the existing two-way traffic flow on Carmunnock Road (Service Road).  Therefore, a questionnaire was posted to the nearby residents to find out if they supported the introduction of a proposed one way system.  The results of the returned survey were 23 in favour of the proposals and 6 against.”
In its response, GoBike argued strongly that cycling must be exempt from the one-way order. Since receiving the Public Consultation email below, GoBike has emailed the City Council for an answer to the one-way question. However, we now note, from the Detailed Report issued with this public consultation that improved safety may be achieved by ” Providing a single directional route for vehicular travel.” Note the use of the word “vehicular”, which would not normally include cycles?

Here’s the Public Consultation email received on 17 January:

MESSAGE SENT ON BEHALF OF KEVIN HAMILTON, HEAD OF ROADS, NEIGHBOURHOODS AND SUSTAINABILITY

Dear Sir or Madam,

THE GLASGOW CITY COUNCIL, (CARMUNNOCK ROAD (SERVICE ROAD)), (TRAFFIC REGULATION) ORDER 20__

Further to my consultation email of 6
th December 2019 regarding the above named Traffic Regulation Order, and in accordance with statutory procedures, I now enclose a copy of the press notice of the proposed Order, relevant map, statement of reasons, detailed report.

Details of the proposals will also be available on the Glasgow City Council website at www.glasgow.gov.uk/proposedtro

As stated in the attached documentation, any person wishing to object to the proposed Order should send details of the grounds for objection in writing to Kevin Hamilton, Head of Roads Neighbourhoods and Sustainability or by e-mail to
land@glasgow.gov.uk by 14th February 2020.

Yours faithfully
” etc

Here are the documents referred to: Press Notice, Plan, Statement of Reasons and Detailed Report.

1.11 Glasgow, Byres Road, Byres Road Traffic Management and Parking Controls, includes cycle lanes, closes 14 February
Cycle lane priority over side road, Enfield, London, England

You may be aware that we responded last autumn to the Stage One consultation concerning the proposed cycle lanes on Byres Road and submitted detailed questions related to the design of the cycle lanes. A major concern is about side road junctions where, to us, it’s obvious that all traffic (motor, cycle, pedestrian) has priority over traffic into and out of side roads. Unfortunately, the City Council appears to take a different view.


We informed you in Digest 51 that the 3 TROs for Byres Road had just been published but full details from the City Council arrived just too late for inclusion in that Digest.

Here’s the email that we received on 06 January, with almost no detail of the cycle lane design:

MESSAGE SENT ON BEHALF OF CHRISTINE FRANCIS, HEAD OF TECHNICAL SERVICES, NEIGHBOURHOODS AND SUSTAINABILITY

Dear Sir or Madam,


THE GLASGOW CITY COUNCIL, (BYRES ROAD) (TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT AND PARKING CONTROLS) ORDER 20_

Further to my consultation email of 28
th October 2019 regarding the above named Traffic Regulation Order, and in accordance with statutory procedures, I now enclose a copy of the press notice of the proposed Order, relevant map, statement of reasons, detailed report and FAQs.

Details of the proposals will also be available on the Glasgow City Council website at
www.glasgow.gov.uk/proposedtro

As stated in the attached documentation, any person wishing to object to the proposed Order should send details of the grounds for objection in writing to Christine Francis, Head of Technical Services or by e-mail to
ByresRoadTRO@glasgow.gov.uk by Friday 14 February 2020

Yours faithfully
” etc

Here are the documents referred to: Press Advert, Plan, Report, Statement of Reasons and FAQs

Some of our members are busy writing our response and our concern at the lack of information on the cycle lane design has been voiced to the City Council.

1.12 Glasgow, Byres Road, 20mph Speed Limit Zone, closes 14 February


GoBike supports 20mph speed limits in our towns and cities and Byres Road is no exception. We supported this proposal at the Stage One consultation in the autumn and no doubt we will support it now.

Here’s the email we received on 06 January:

MESSAGE SENT ON BEHALF OF CHRISTINE FRANCIS, HEAD OF TECHNICAL SERVICES, NEIGHBOURHOODS AND SUSTAINABILITY

Dear Sir or Madam,

THE GLASGOW CITY COUNCIL, (BYRES ROAD) (20MPH SPEED LIMIT ZONE) ORDER 20_

Further to my consultation email of 28
th October 2019 regarding the above named Traffic Regulation Order, and in accordance with statutory procedures, I now enclose a copy of the press notice of the proposed Order, relevant map, statement of reasons, detailed report and FAQs.

Details of the proposals will also be available on the Glasgow City Council website at www.glasgow.gov.uk/proposedtro

As stated in the attached documentation, any person wishing to object to the proposed Order should send details of the grounds for objection in writing to Christine Francis, Head of Technical Services or by e-mail to
ByresRoad20MPH@glasgow.gov.uk by Friday 14 February 2020

Yours faithfully
” etc

Here are the documents referred to: Press Advert, Plan, Report, Statement of Reasons and FAQs.

The FAQs are certainly not directed at those of us keen on active travel; here’s one Q and A:
Can I park / load in the cycle lanes?
 Parking / Loading from the cycle lanes is not permitted

Yes, the motor driver is still seen as the main customer – the the FAQs are the same for all 3 TROs.

1.13 Glasgow, Byres Road, Hillhead Traffic Management and Parking Controls, closes 14 February

Car parking on the streets around Byres Road is not normally a major concern for most of us in GoBike, but if you live in Hillhead you might have a different view or particular concern about this proposal? If so, do email consultations@gobike.org and we can include it in our response.
Points we have noted so far include the introduction of a second car parking permit per household (why should that be introduced in a city that’s trying to reduce car ownership, reduce pollution and will be hosting COP26 in November?) and the ridiculously cheap parking charges (even if they are the same across the city). Surely parking charges should be at least the cost of a return ticket on the Subway or bus and not just 80p per hour?
Here’s the email received from the City Council on 06 January:

MESSAGE SENT ON BEHALF OF CHRISTINE FRANCIS, HEAD OF TECHNICAL SERVICES, NEIGHBOURHOODS AND SUSTAINABILITY

Dear Sir or Madam,

THE GLASGOW CITY COUNCIL (HILLHEAD) (TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT AND PARKING CONTROLS) ORDER 20_

Further to my consultation email of 28th October 2019 regarding the above named Traffic Regulation Order, and in accordance with statutory procedures, I now enclose a copy of the press notice of the proposed Order, relevant map, statement of reasons, detailed report and FAQs.

Details of the proposals will also be available on the Glasgow City Council website at
www.glasgow.gov.uk/proposedtro

As stated in the attached documentation, any person wishing to object to the proposed Order should send details of the grounds for objection in writing to Christine Francis, Head of Technical Services or by e-mail to
HillheadTRO@glasgow.gov.uk by Friday 14 February 2020

Yours faithfully
” etc

The attached documents are here: Press Advert, Plan, Report, Statement of Reasons and FAQs.

This information was included in the Stage One email, but there is far more information within the Report:

Background to the proposed Order
The proposal is to amend the existing Hillhead parking controls from a Controlled Parking Zone (CPZ) to a Restricted Parking Zone (RPZ).
RPZs are indicated by zone entry signs which have a no waiting roundel to inform that no waiting is permitted at any time outwith the bays. The zone entry signs tell you to “park only in signed bays” with a no waiting roundel which means no waiting at any time. This is the restriction which applies outwith all the marked bays.
This order will propose the conversion of “residents only” parking bays to “shared use” bays in order to bring the parking regime in Hillhead into line with other residential areas within the west-end. Whilst all bays will become “shared use”, residents will be able to acquire a second personal permit and visitor permits, fees will be in line with other zones. Permits will also be usable in adjacent zones. The order will also include proposals to pedestrianise Ashton Lane / Great George Lane with service access limited to specific times and controlled by drop-bollards. Residential access to the rear of Ashton Road will be maintained. Cresswell Lane will remain pedestrianised.

The private car is still at the top of the transport tree, it seems.

1.14 **NEW** Scottish Government, Housing to 2040: consultation on outline policy options, closes 28 February

GoBike member, Emily, alerted us to this consultation, which has a question on “Do you have any proposals that would improve the space around our homes and promote connected places and vibrant communities?” and the ‘vision’ and background refer to lots of relevant stuff about connectivity, walking and cycling, vibrant local areas, climate emergency, air pollution, etc.

Here’s the link: https://www.gov.scot/publications/housing-2040-consultation-outline-policy-options/pages/3/

Do have a look and let’s get lots of responses in that mention cycling and active travel.

Section 2: Forthcoming Consultations

2.1 Glasgow, South West City Way, St Andrews Drive extension, consultation event TOMORROW, 22 January

Going hand in hand with Item 1.2 above, the on-line consultation on the SWCW extension along St Andrew’s Drive, is this public consultation event tomorrow, Wednesday 22 January at St Albert’s Primary School, 36 Maxwell Drive from 3:30 to 7pm. You may see details of the proposals at this link. Do try and get to the event if you can; there will be the opportunity to speak to the staff involved about the proposals.

2.2 Glasgow Avenues, Stockwell Street and Glassford Street Avenue, 25 January

Mentioned in Item 1.4 above, is this on-street, meet the people event:

Drop-in to our on-street consultation: look out for out friendly rickshaw displays on Saturday 25th January, where staff will be on hand to discuss the emerging design thinking and to record your opinion on the concept designs.

We don’t have any more information but it should be quite easy to spot one or other of the 2 rickshaws that the consultants will have. If you are in the town, do look out for the displays; check out the area at the end of the Argyle Street precinct or the car park areas on Stockwell Street.

2.3 Glasgow, Transforming Pollok Country Park – Public Meeting, 04 February

On 17 January GoBike received this email from The Transforming Pollok Country Park Project Team within Glasgow Life:

Hello,

Following previous consultation events, Glasgow City Council and Glasgow Life would like to invite you to a public meeting on the access proposals being developed for Pollok Country Park, as part of the Transforming Pollok Country Park project.

The purpose of this meeting is to share the proposals, summarise recent changes in response to feedback from previous consultations, and outline current progress ahead of a formal planning submission later in February 2020.

Transforming Pollok Country Park

Public Meeting

Tuesday 4 February, 6.30–7.45pm

at Pollokshaws Burgh Hall, Pollokshaws Road, G43 1NE

The meeting will include a presentation lasting up to 45 minutes followed by up to 30 minutes for questions.

We hope you can join us. If you’re unable to attend but would like to find out more, please email us at
PollokCountryParkTransformation@glasgowlife.org.uk.

Kind regards,
The Transforming Pollok Country Park Project Team”

Section 3: Consultation Feedback

3.1 Glasgow, Fastlink Route, (Finnieston Bridge to Whitefield Road) Order 2015, Amendment No.1 20__, acknowledgement of GoBike objection



Our objection to the proposal to allow taxis and authorised vehicles to use the bus and cycle lanes on this bridge was published in Digest 50, Item 1.2 We received this acknowledgement on 07 January:


MESSAGE SENT ON BEHALF OF CHRISTINE FRANCIS, HEAD OF TECHNICAL SERVICES, NEIGHBOURHOODS AND SUSTAINABILITY

Dear Tricia Fort

THE GLASGOW CITY COUNCIL, FASTLINK ROUTE, (FINNIESTON BRIDGE TO WHITEFIELD ROAD) ORDER 2015, AMENDMENT No.1 20__

I am writing to confirm receipt of your correspondence regarding the above named Traffic Regulation Order. Following the publication period, officers shall commence an analysis of all correspondence received and issue you with a considered response in due course.

Please note that timescales for preparing and distributing a considered response can be influenced by the quantity and nature of correspondence received.

Yours faithfully
” etc

Let’s hope they are rethinking the proposal, especially since it is so close to the site of the COP26 Conference in November.

3.2 Glasgow, Ashgill Road Traffic Calming, GCC response to our concerns.

This consultation was detailed in Digest 50, Item 3.10 Our letter, sent in on 18 December, raised concerns that the GCC response to speeding on this wide road in the north of the city was to yet again install speed cushions with no thought to narrowing the road with cycle lanes etc. Note that no Traffic Regulation Order is required for the installation of speed cushions. The City Council response to our letter, with this email of 08 January, is illuminating as to how the Council currently operates:

MESSAGE SENT ON BEHALF OF MICHAEL BRADY, GROUP MANAGER – TRAFFIC AND ROAD SAFETY, NEIGHBOURHOODS AND SUSTAINABILITY

Dear Ms Fort

Thank you for your undernoted enquiry.

Whilst I appreciate your concerns regarding Ashgill Road not being included as part of the city’s cycle network, I can advise that this section is focused on reducing injury accidents throughout the city. The council has limited funding and resources available to implement traffic calming schemes and in order to make sure these resources are directed at the locations with the greatest potential for casualty reduction, a site risk assessment is undertaken for each request. This process assesses the location against criteria including the history of injury accidents, measured vehicle speeds and the presence of any local amenities such as being close to a nearby school or nursery


I can advise that the Local Transport Note for Traffic Calming (LTN 1/07), which gives guidance on the design, effectiveness and installation of traffic calming measures, states that “Distances between cushions, or cushions and the kerb, should not generally exceed 1200mm, with 1000mm as an ideal maximum. These dimensions are designed to deter drivers of small vehicles from attempting to drive in the gap.” The Local Transport Note also recommends a maximum spacing distance of 70 metres between each set of speed cushions, however, in this instance we would consider that the road bends at this location also act as traffic calming features.

Whilst I appreciate that drivers may accelerate and brake between each set of cushions, the Council are currently seeking to implement mandatory 20mph city-wide speed limit restrictions on appropriate roads. Should the restrictions be introduced, a reduction in the permitted speed limit would encourage drivers to maintain a reduced speed whilst negotiating speed cushions or any other form of traffic calming feature.


I trust the above information is of assistance, however, should you require any further information please contact (name and phone number removed by GoBike).

3.3 Glasgow, Duror Street, Traffic Calming, GCC response to our concerns

Again, this consultation was detailed in Digest 50, item 3.13 and we submitted this letter on 18 December. To reduce speeding by motor vehicles on this wide road in the east of the city it seems to be a reasonable suggestion to stop most through motor traffic with a filter to allow only buses (and emergency vehicles) and bikes through but here’s the reply that we received on 10 January. Note that the installation of speed cushions does not require a traffic regulation order and that a filter, of the type we propose, ie one with rising bollards or similar, would not prevent residents accessing either side of that filter:

MESSAGE SENT ON BEHALF OF MICHAEL BRADY, GROUP MANAGER – TRAFFIC AND ROAD SAFETY, NEIGHBOURHOODS AND SUSTAINABILITY

Dear Ms Fort

Thank you for your undernoted enquiry.

I can advise that the introduction of a bus/cycle gate would require the Council to successfully promote a Traffic Regulation Order (TRO). The legal process of promoting a TRO is subject to formal consultation and public advertisement, is open to objection and can take in excess of 12 months to complete. The promotion of such an order also requires the support of emergency services and various other road user groups. It is highly likely that the introduction of a bus/cycle gate on Duror Street would lead to objections from local residents as they would be unable to park near to their properties. In view of the foregoing, there are no plans at present for a bus/cycle gate to be introduced at this location.

I can advise that the Local Transport Note for Traffic Calming (LTN 1/07), which gives guidance on the design, effectiveness and installation of traffic calming measures, states that “Distances between cushions, or cushions and the kerb, should not generally exceed 1200mm, with 1000mm as an ideal maximum. These dimensions are designed to deter drivers of small vehicles from attempting to drive in the gap.” The Local Transport Note also recommends a maximum spacing distance of 70 metres between each set of speed cushions and this recommendation has been adhered to in the design of this traffic calming proposal.

I trust the above information is of assistance, however, should you require any further information please contact
” (name and phone number removed by GoBike)

3.4 Glasgow, construction of Sighthill pedestrian/cycle bridge to start next month

GoBike has responded to several consultations about the regeneration of Sighthill, and some might remember that this was a favourite project of the one-time Cycling Czar Councillor Frank McAveety? Who’s he? Some newer GoBike members might ask. However, the Glasgow (Evening) Times reported on 11 January that construction of the bridge should start in February, be completed in August 2021 and cost £19m. See: https://www.glasgowtimes.co.uk/news/18153032.development-sighthill-bridge-cost-19m/?ref=ebln

3.5 Glasgow, Connecting Woodside Update, with news of the Woodside ‘Making Places’ project

If you don’t subscribe direct to the Connecting Woodside updates then you will have missed the free family fun event on Saturday but there is a new Facebook page about the Making Places project that is working in tandem with the active travel team. See this link and if you live in the area do get involved. If you would like to ask a question to the project team about this update or the project? Email sustainabletransport@glasgow.gov.uk.

3.6 Glasgow Avenues project, George Square and Blythswood Square.
A vision of what Blythswood Square could look like in the future (Herald photo)

News of the Avenues and these 2 squares and yet more consultation in today’s Herald newspaper; follow this link for the details. Let’s hope for the best that it happens.

3.7 East Dunbartonshire, Proposed Traffic Regulation Order – Killermont Avenue, Rannoch Drive and Woodvale Avenue, Bearsden – Waiting & Loading Restrictions, approved

The Traffic Regulation Order, which we supported, see Digest 45, Item 1.2, to limit parking in this area near the car showroom, has now been approved, and here’s the confirmation from East Dunbartonshire Council, received today, 21 January:

Dear Sir/Madam

The Traffic Regulation Orders mentioned below has now been made and will become effective on Monday, 23 March 2020.

Attached are copies of the Order and plan, together with copy of the Notice that is to appear in the edition of the Milngavie and Bearsden Herald which is published on 24 January 2020.

Yours faithfully

Fiona Stirling
Legal Services, 12 Strathkelvin Place, Kirkintilloch, G66 1TJ
Telephone 0300 12345 10 (Ext 8012)

Note Referred to:- 1. The East Dunbartonshire Council (Killermont Avenue, Rannoch Drive And Woodvale Avenue, Bearsden) (No Waiting And No Loading At Any Time Restrictions) Order 2020.
(See attached file: 200121 Killermont, etc – Waiting Time Order 2020.pdf)

Good to get something in from outwith the city, but we do hope to get more positive news in before COP26, which will be upon us before we know it.